Search Results

    Blog Posts (3)
    • Brexit: three overlooked facts

      The Brexit process is truly fascinating. Some new drama unfolds nearly every day. As a result, maybe, some very basic facts tend to be overlooked, probably because they would undermine the dramatically entertaining value of these events. It all seems crazy and, in a way it is, but the process is more reasonable than it looks. The first fact is that nothing much will happen on B-day, with or without a deal. As is often said, the focus of past negotiations has been on the divorce, not on future relations. This is why the deal foresees a two-year transition, to allow for negotiating future arrangements with the EU. There are zillions of decisions to be taken within the broad framework of the deal. They range from what exactly happens at the borders to the status of EU citizens working or living in the UK and of British citizens working or living in the EU and to mutual recognitions of standards for each and every good or service that will be traded. Without a deal, all of these things will also have to be negotiated, even if they is no explicitly agreed framework. Because geography implies that there will be a lot of trade and movement of people between the EU and the UK, a no-deal Brexit will require a transition period as well. During this period, little will actually change, simply because no one wants to see total disruption, even the hardest of the hard-Brexiters who still have to grasp the day-to-day implications of what they wish for. One way or another, a standstill will have to come. The second fact is that the British economy has become totally integrated into the EU economy over more than forty years. As a consequence, European laws govern everything that concerns trade within the UK and with the EU, commerce with third parties, consumer protection, anti-trust and more. The UK will have to build from scratch a new legal apparatus. British firms will have to disentangle a myriad of links with their European partners. Non-national residents will have to reorganize their lives. Even if the EU is not a perfect arrangement, it works reasonably well. This implies that it will be best for the UK to retain many of existing EU laws and for firms in the EU and in the UK to maintain much of existing links. Brexit is a huge disturbance with limited long-run practical effects. Meanwhile, firms face a massive uncertainty and postpone productive while some have relocated or downscaled their activities in the UK. Eventually post-Brexit UK will not differ much from what it now is. The third fact, which may be lost in the spectacular debates that we have seen over the last few weeks, follows from the previous observation: Brexit is impossible, or nearly so. Much has been said about the stability and pragmatism of the British democratic institutions but, all of a sudden, it seems to have become highly dysfunctional and irrational. Of course, the referendum should not have been called, or the question asked should have been better designed. So, yes, a huge mistake was made. It is worth asking how can a stable and pragmatic democracy manage an impossible task. A poorly functioning democracy would just have made Brexit happen, without second thoughts. The convulsions that we observe reveal the more or less conscious efforts of the British system to deal with the situation. Theresa May famously said that “Brexit is Brexit” but then she discovered that things are not so simple. Part of her predicament was to negotiate a reasonable deal, much more complex than what she had envisioned, but she also faced a Parliament that rejected every single proposal that she made. The inability of Parliament to come up with alternatives is often described as the ultimate proof that it is totally dysfunctional. Alternatively, it may be that it simply recognized that there is no good way of leaving the EU. Millions of citizens marched to ask for a second referendum, one where the alternatives would be well specified. The former fringe Tories who are now in power reject this natural step, but they seem overwhelmed by the resistance that they face. All of that makes a lot of sense. We do not know yet how it will all end up.

    • Brexit and the Zealots

      A new blogpost: https://www.charleswyplosz.info/blog Un nouvel article sur le Brexit et les Zélotes: https://www.charleswyplosz.info/blog-fr

    • Reform of the Stability Pact: political leaders simply give up

      Meeting ‘informally’ in mid-September, the Finance Ministers of the Eurozone considered reforms of the Stability Pact. They concluded that the task was too complicated, too controversial, sure to fail. Refusing to face up to the challenge is a sure way of laying ground for a future major turmoil. In 1997, shortly before the launch of the euro, Germany proposed what eventually became the Stability Pact. The proposal was directly inspired by the German federal experience but it had no chance to work in the European Union (and, anyway, it does not work well in Germany either). Yet, it was accepted without serious discussion. The view in Paris was that it was not worth a confrontation with Germany since the pact would not be respected anyway. This is indeed what happened. Beyond continuous frictions on the importance of abiding by accepted rules, the fraught pact is directly responsible for the sovereign debt crisis that erupted in 2010-12, coming close to scuttling the single currency. The consequences of bad economic policy choices rarely surface right away, but they eventually do. Even before the crisis, it had become increasingly difficult to ignore the pact’s weaknesses, a first reform was agreed in 2005. After the crisis, more reforms were agreed. Each time, the pact’s deep misconceptions were studiously set aside. Rather, the focus was to refine its strictures, mostly by adding bells and whistles. Today’s pact is extraordinarily complex et deeply bureaucratic, the result of multiple changes that aim at the symptoms, not the root causes of its failure. Am I exaggerating? For a long time, officialdom and many analysts thought so. The European Commission, in particular, staunchly defended the pact, which it was responsible for and from which it seemingly derived much authority. Not anymore. The Commission has finally accepted that the current pact is unlikely to adequately function. The recently created independent European Fiscal Board just published an official report that does not mince its words and largely validates the above criticism. The September meeting of Finance Ministers was presented with proposals by the Commission and by the European Fiscal Board. Mind you, these proposals do not challenge the fundamental architecture of the pact but, for the first time, some of its key aspects. They probably are the best that officialdom can suggest. The main suggestions aim at moving away from nitpicking about annual budgets towards a longer-term strategic appraisal, trying to combine short-term flexibility with long-term rigor. However, these proposals in effect challenge the pact’s logic, including the infamous limits of 3% for the deficits and 60% for the public debts. Were these objectives misleading? Yes. Do the new proposals stand to work better than the existing arrangements? You bet they do. Can we be sure that they will deliver fiscal discipline in each and every member country? We don’t. But for politicians, it is nigh impossible to recognize past mistakes. Risk taking (will it work 100%?) is terrifying, even if improvement is guaranteed. Anyway, they simply cannot fathom the opening of negotiations that are bound to be politically divisive and technically challenging. On the other side, they have no trouble kicking the can down the road and keeping in place an arrangement that stands to lead to yet another major crisis. This is not new, of course. This is what they did with earlier pact reforms. It delivered the sovereign debt crisis, which came about shortly after the Global Financial Crisis, itself the consequence of similar thinking. These crises delivered rising Euro-skepticism, they debased the credibility of the governing elites, which led to the current wave of populism and to the rise of extremism. Today’s politicians apparently fail to grasp the risk that they will lose power and that the survival of liberal democracies is at stake. ​ ​

    View All
    Pages (55)
    • 2020.7.31 Relance 1 | Charles Wyplosz

      Le nouveau plan de relance européen – 1ère partie ​ 31 juillet 2020 ​ L’accord sur le plan de relance de 750 milliards d’euro a quelque chose d’enthousiasmant. Le nouveau mécanisme, qui atteint plus de 5% du PIB européen, est nécessaire pour que tous les gouvernements puissent encourager une reprise à la hauteur de la catastrophe économique créée par le Covid. Il constitue aussi une innovation importante et démontre un niveau élevé de solidarité. Cependant, au-delà des effets d’annonce et du soulagement budgétaire qu’il promet, les montants eux-mêmes sont modestes et de nombreux sujets d’inquiétude émergent des détails de l’accord et de ce qui n’y figure pas. J’examine ces inquiétudes en trois parties. Dans cette première partie, je montre que les chiffres annoncés ne disent pas tout et que les dépenses arriveront sans doute trop tard. Dans une , j’explique que les questions d’aléa moral, qui ont rendu les négociations difficiles, ont été trop largement ignorées. Dans une , j’explique mes inquiétudes sur la manière dont ces 750 milliards seront dépensés. deuxième partie troisième partie Sans aucun doute, un tabou a été brisé, ouvrant la porte à un évolution historique. Depuis des années, les pays du Nord, y-compris l’Allemagne, ont rejeté de nombreuses propositions de création d’une forme ou d’une autre d’eurobons, des emprunts collectifs par les pays de la zone euro. La logique de ce refus est incontournable : les pays peu endettés ne veulent pas garantir des dettes émises par les autres pays qui n’ont jamais pu faire redescendre leur endettement public à des niveaux moins dangereux. Cependant, une autre logique est également incontournable : ces dettes, héritées du passé, représentent un danger réel pour la survie de l’euro dans la mesure où elles peuvent empêcher la zone dans son ensemble de faire face à un choc sévère. De fait, face à ce blocage, s’est imposée l’idée selon laquelle progressivement les pays hautement endettés allaient d’abord réduire leurs dettes, permettant alors d’envisager des mécanismes d’emprunt collectifs. Rien ne pressait, disait-on, et les réductions de dette tout comme les propositions de création d’eurobons pouvaient attendre. Évidemment, cette vision rassurante, rien ne presse, était injustifiée parce que les chocs finissent toujours par se produire, de manière inattendue. Les miracles aussi se produisent aussi de manière inattendue. Face au choc du Covid, et au risque d’une explosion de la zone euro de l’EU, Angela Merkel a abandonné le vieux dogme allemand. Officiellement, ce revirement est une réponse exceptionnelle à un événement historique unique. En fait, il est très probable que d’autres chocs futurs seront considérés exceptionnels. Nous restons loin d’une union budgétaire, ou ce que les Allemands appellent une union de transferts, mais un précédent a été créé. Mais le précédent ne pourra être invoqué que si l’expérience réussit, ce qui est loin d’être assuré. Comme toujours, les chiffres annoncés doivent être soigneusement interprétés. L’objectif annoncé du fonds de relance est de permettre aux pays empêtrés par des dettes publiques élevées de dépenser ce qu’il faut pour sortir de la récession. C’est maintenant qu’il faut agir. Mais le fonds est prévu pour trois ans (2021-3), ce qui veut dire seulement 1,8% du PIB par an, en moyenne, dont une part importante arrivera trop tard. En effet, si un vaccin est disponible en 2021, la reprise ne sera pas entièrement spontanée. Certes, une fois la peur du virus éliminée, la consommation va fortement redémarrer, mais seulement s’il n’y a pas eu trop de dégâts entre temps. Ce qu’il faut à tout prix, au sens littéral, c’est éviter une trop forte montée du chômage et limiter les faillites d’entreprises. Les mesures actuelles de soutien aux employés et aux entreprises ont bien marché jusqu’à présent, et elles doivent absolument être poursuivies. Leur coût peut facilement atteindre 5% du PIB, ou plus. Une petite moitié du Fonds doit prendre la forme de prêts aux gouvernements, ce qui va faire grimper les dettes publiques. Le reste, environ 390 milliards, seront des transferts (des dons de l’EU) aux gouvernements, et c’est ce qui représente une grande nouveauté. Mais qui va payer pour ces cadeaux ? De manière surprenante, cette question cruciale n’a pas reçu de réponse claire. La Commission demande que soient augmentées ses ressources propres. À la différence des contributions annuelles versés par les pays membres, les ressources propres proviennent de taxes perçues par la Commission (essentiellement des droits de douane, des amendes et une petite part des revenus nationaux de la TVA). Depuis longtemps, la Commission rêve d’augmenter des ressources propres, de manière à réduire leur dépendance au bon vouloir des gouvernements, qui se sont toujours montrés plutôt avares. Ces dernières années, les ressources propres représentaient environ 30% des revenus de la Commission. Le nouvel accord mentionne diverses ressources propres potentielles, essentiellement une taxe sur les plastiques, une taxe carbone prélevée aux frontières sur les produits importés et une taxe sur les transactions financières. Par le passé, ces différentes taxes ont été aussi controversées que les Eurobons, cependant. En l’absence d’un accroissement important des ressources propres, le service de la nouvelle dette collective de 750 milliards devra être financé par les contributions des pays membres. Autrement dit, en 2021-3, chaque pays membre recevra de la Commission des transferts (des cadeaux) qu’il devra payer ensuite pour que la dette soit remboursée, en 2058 au plus tard. Ce tour de passe comporte deux implications. D’abord, toute l’opération consiste à emprunter collectivement maintenant et à rembourser collectivement l’emprunt plus tard. C’est une bonne idée mais, techniquement, cela ressemble furieusement à une émission d’Eurobons, même si officiellement cette interprétation est catégoriquement rejetée. Ensuite, ce que chaque pays recevra en net, la différence entre les transferts bruts reçu et les contributions au remboursement des 750 milliards, sera bien différent des cadeaux annoncés. Il est admis que certains pays (du Sud) recevront plus qu’ils ne paieront alors que d’autres (du Nord) feront l’inverse. Les montants nets ne seront connus qu’à la fin de l’opération, mais il est clair que le montant net des cadeaux sera bien inférieur aux 390 milliards annoncés, déjà une fraction des 750 milliards. Diverses prédictions ont été avancées. Elles sont l’objet d’un grand intérêt, surtout dans les milieux politiques. Par exemple, le plan développé par la Commission avant l’accord, indiquait que l’Italie allait recevoir des transferts nets de l’ordre de 3,2% de son PIB alors que l’Allemagne contribuerait en net quelques 3,9%. Ces chiffres ronflants ont de fortes chances d’être décevants car chaque pays va maintenant se battre pour défendre ses propres intérêts. Avant l’accord, le FMI a calculé que jusqu’à la mi-juin, l’Italie avait mis en place un plan de relance de l’ordre de 3,5% de son PIB alors que l’Allemagne mobilisait 9,4%. La raison de cette différence est la capacité perçue de chaque pays à emprunter l’argent nécessaire. Cette énorme différence constituait un non-sens économique et une menace politique. Le fait qu’un accord ait été conclu devrait aider les pays très endettés, comme l’Italie, à emprunter sur les marchés financiers. C’est une aide considérable.

    • 2020.8.3 Relance 3 | Charles Wyplosz

      Le nouveau plan de relance européen – 3ème partie ​ 3 août 2020 L’accord sur le plan de relance de 750 milliards d’euro a quelque chose d’enthousiasmant. Le nouveau mécanisme, qui atteint plus de 5% du PIB européen, est nécessaire pour que tous les gouvernements puissent encourager une reprise à la hauteur de la catastrophe économique créée par le Covid. Il constitue aussi une innovation importante et démontre un niveau élevé de solidarité. Cependant, au-delà des effets d’annonce et du soulagement budgétaire qu’il promet, les montants eux-mêmes sont modestes et de nombreux sujets d’inquiétude émergent des détails de l’accord et de ce qui n’y figure pas. J’examine ces inquiétudes en trois parties. Dans la , je montre que les chiffres annoncés ne disent pas tout et que les dépenses arriveront sans doute trop tard. Dans la , j’explique que les questions d’aléa moral, qui ont rendu les négociations difficiles, ont été trop largement ignorées. Dans cette troisième partie, j’explique mes inquiétudes sur la manière dont ces 750 milliards seront dépensés. première partie deuxième partie Comment faire des eurobons sans les appeler eurobons ? Dans le nord de l’Europe, les eurobons sont devenus un véritable repoussoir et pourtant une forme ou une autre d’eurobons est indispensable pour sortir la zone euro – et donc de l’EU – de la crise économique provoquée par le Coronavirus. La solution, apparemment astucieuse, a consisté à charger la Commission Européenne d’emprunter en son propre nom. Une astuce qui va créer bien des difficultés, cependant. Si c’est la Commission qui emprunte, c’est la Commission qui va dépenser. Or les dépenses de la Commission sont toujours controversées, parfois même conflictuelles, ce qui nourrit depuis longtemps des doutes sur leur utilité. Le résultat de ce tour de passe-passe risque fort d’être compliqué sur le plan administratif, soumis à des arbitrages politiques et même peut-être une source de gaspillage. Le déchiffrage des conclusions du Sommet Européen, qui s’est tenu du 17 au 21 juillet 2020, est ardu. Le communiqué mélange le budget multiannuel de 1074,3 millions d’euros et le programme de relance de 750 milliards. C’est intentionnel car il s’agit de montrer que le programme n’est qu’un « effort extraordinaire de relance » qui vient compléter le budget habituel de la Commission, rien à voir avec des eurobons, donc. Le communiqué présente des dizaines de programmes de dépenses, anciens et nouveaux, qui portent des titres ronflants mais vides de sens – comme RescEU ou Horizon Europe – et des acronymes qui ne peuvent que décourager la plupart des lecteurs. Les présentations officielles du succès historique de ce Sommet mettent l’accent sur les 390 milliards d’euros qui seront distribués comme des dons, répartis sur trois ans, et accompagnés de prêts d’une valeur de 360 milliards. Ces dons représentent environ 2,8% du PIB de l’UE soit près de 1% par an. C’est une somme considérable, qui doublera presque le budget de la Commission entre 2021 et 2023. Les pays membres devront consacrer ce montant à des dépenses que la Commission considère comme des bonnes causes. De fait, 77,5 milliards sont déjà affectés à certaines dépenses chères à la Commission. Ainsi, 47,5 milliards sont consacrés au programme ReactEU, qui vise à aider des industries en grande difficulté. On se prend à penser à des grandes entreprises zombie et à des groupes de pression. Une fois cette somme pré-affectée prise en compte, il reste 312,5 milliards pour la Facilité de Reprise et de Résilience (qui devient, bien sûr, l’acronyme FRR), qui inclue aussi les 360 milliards de prêts. Pour recevoir ces dons, les pays membres devront présenter à la Commission leurs projets de dépenses. C’est ici qu’apparaissent les bonnes causes. Avec l’accord des pays membres, ces projets devront majoritairement être consacrés à la transition verte et à la transition digitale. La transition verte, qui remplace le Green New Deal cher à la Président von der Leyen, vise à réduire de 40% les émissions carbonées d’ici 2030, essentiellement en distribuant des subventions aux particuliers et aux entreprises. L’adoption d’une taxe carbone, qui serait bien plus efficace et qui ne coûte rien, n’est pas prévue au programme. De la même manière, c’est à coups de subventions qu’il est prévu de réussir la transition digitale. Ce programme évoque l’écho lointain de la Stratégie de Lisbonne, adoptée en 2000 par la Commission Barroso, dont l’objectif annoncé était de « faire de l’Europe l’économie de la connaissance la plus compétitive et la plus dynamique au monde d’ici 2010 ». C’était six ans après la création de Amazon et quatre ans avant celle de Facebook, sans la moindre subvention. Les ambitions irréalistes sont une vieille tradition européenne. Rien ne garantit donc que les dépenses pour ces bonnes causes permettront d’atteindre les objectifs annoncés. Ce qui est clair, c’est qu’il y a un hiatus entre la « reprise », qui requiert des interventions immédiates, et les deux « transitions », qui relèvent du long terme. Le titre du fonds, la Facilité de Reprise et de Résilience, est assurément trompeur. En fait, le titre choisi pour l’ensemble du plan de 750 milliards, Next GenerationEU, correspond mieux aux ambitions, axées sur le long terme et bien éloignées des besoins immédiats d’accélérer la reprise. Avec un peu de cynisme, on peut se dire que peu importe où va l’argent, aussi longtemps qu’il est injecté dans l’économie européenne. Mais on peut aussi imaginer tous les comités qui vont sélectionner au niveau national les projets à soumettre à la Commission qui, elle-même va devoir créer ses propres comités de sélection. Quand l’argent à distribuer atteint des centaines de milliards, on peut encore imaginer la pression que toutes sortes de lobbies et d’entreprises vont appliquer pour recevoir une tranche de ce gigantesque gâteau. Et, bien sûr, les gouvernements vont essayer de peser au maximum sur le partage. La de ce blog explique que certains pays recevront plus d’argent du fonds qu’ils n’y mettront, d’autres seront des contributeurs nets. Ces choix seront régis par des critères énoncés dans l’accord mais, encore une fois, il n’y a pas besoin d’une imagination débordante pour anticiper combien chaque gouvernement va s’efforcer de tirer la couverture à soi. Il s’agira d’obtenir le meilleur retour, de financer des entreprises nationales et toutes sortes de dépenses politiquement sensibles. Après tout, c’est ainsi que fonctionne le budget habituel de la Commission que Next GenerationEU vient officiellement compléter. deuxième partie

    • 2020.8.1 Relance 2 | Charles Wyplosz

      Le nouveau plan de relance européen – 2ème partie ​ 1er août 2020 ​ L’accord sur le plan de relance de 750 milliards d’euro a quelque chose d’enthousiasmant. Le nouveau mécanisme, qui atteint plus de 5% du PIB européen, est nécessaire pour que tous les gouvernements puissent encourager une reprise à la hauteur de la catastrophe économique créée par le Covid. Il constitue aussi une innovation importante et démontre un niveau élevé de solidarité. Cependant, au-delà des effets d’annonce et du soulagement budgétaire qu’il promet, les montants eux-mêmes sont modestes et de nombreux sujets d’inquiétude émergent des détails de l’accord et de ce qui n’y figure pas. J’examine ces inquiétudes en trois parties. Dans la , je montre que les chiffres annoncés ne disent pas tout et que les dépenses arriveront sans doute trop tard. Dans cette deuxième partie, j’explique que les questions d’aléa moral, qui ont rendu les négociations difficiles, ont été trop largement ignorées. Dans une , j’explique mes inquiétudes sur la manière dont ces 750 milliards seront dépensés. première partie troisième partie Le revirement spectaculaire de la Chancelière Merkel fait l’objet de multiples discussions. Des années durant, l’Allemagne a rejeté toute idée d’emprunt collectif par les pays membres de la zone euro. Des émissions collectives de dettes publiques étaient exclues au nom de « l’aléa moral ». Le raisonnement est le suivant. Des émissions collectives de dettes publiques impliquaient l’obligation pour l’Allemagne (et les autres pays qui pratiquent la discipline budgétaire) de garantir les emprunts des pays dont les gouvernements n’ont pas été disciplinés pendant des années. L’aléa moral, dans ce cas, est que de telles garanties revenaient à encourager l’indiscipline budgétaire. Quand la pandémie s’est produite, j’ai affirmé ailleurs (en anglais) que l’aléa moral ne devait pas être encore utilisé pour rejeter toute réponse collective à la grave crise économique qui allait suivre, et ce pour deux raisons. Tout d’abord, le Covid est un choc totalement imprévu (encore que les épidémiologues nous avaient expliqué qu’une grave pandémie était inévitable). Dans ce cas, il n’y pas d’aléa moral. En effet, aider financièrement les pays les plus touchés par le Covid ne risque pas de les encourager à favoriser d’autres épidémies dans le seul but de recevoir plus d’aides. Ensuite, l’existence même de l’euro, et sans doute de l’EU, serait menacée si certains pays se retrouvaient dans l’impossibilité d’emprunter les moyens nécessaires pour faire face à l’épidémie parce que leurs dettes publiques étaient déjà trop élevées. La présence d’un aléa moral – aider des pays lourdement endettés – ne pouvait pas justifier de prendre le risque d’un éclatement de l’UE. La nouvelle ligne officielle, en Allemagne et ailleurs, met l’accent sur le caractère exceptionnel du choc du Covid. Écarter ainsi toute discussion de l’aléa moral est un peu court, cependant. D’abord, il est frappant de constater que l’impact du Covid n’a pas été le même partout. Certains pays ont très vite imposé des règles de distanciations sociales, d’autres ont trainé. De plus, l’épidémie a révélé de fortes disparités entre les systèmes de santé. Ensuite, tout de même, les pays aujourd’hui coincés par une endettement public élevé ne sont pas des victimes tout à fait innocentes. Aider des pays qui durant des années ont commis des erreurs (indiscipline budgétaire, politiques de santé) et qui ont pris de mauvaises décisions face à la crise sanitaire, est une cause d’aléa moral. Relativiser l’importance de l’aléa moral pour construire un fonds de relance était justifié, mais cela ne signifie que la question doive-t-être ignorée. L’existence de dettes publiques dangereusement élevées, la raison principale pour laquelle un fonds de relance européen est nécessaire, reste une source d’aléa moral. Un bon accord aurait simultanément créé un fonds de relance et mis en œuvre des mesures pour faire baisser les dettes le moment venu. Les pays dont la dette est élevée ne sont pas les seuls responsables, il existe aussi une bonne part de responsabilité collective. Cette responsabilité collective constitue le socle du Pacte de Stabilité et de Croissance. Si le pacte avait été efficace, vingt ans après sa mise œuvre, l’indiscipline budgétaire aurait dû avoir disparu. Tous les pays membres de la zone euro doivent admettre qu’ils ont collectivement failli. Ils ont créé un pacte qui ne fonctionne pas, et ne peut pas fonctionner. Ils l’ont constaté année après année, mais ils ne l’ont jamais reconnu, se contentant d’ajustements technocratiques relativement mineurs qui ont permis à l’indiscipline budgétaire de se perpétuer. Jamais ils n’ont envisagé d’autres mécanismes, parce que les avis divergeaient et un accord politique semblait impossible. C’est là une limite grave du plan de relance. La création d’un fonds de relance européen était tout aussi difficile qu’une réforme en profondeur du Pacte de Stabilité, voire de son remplacement par un mécanisme alternatif (comme beaucoup d’autres, j’ai avancé, une ). Le plan de relance offrait une occasion unique de réformer l’approche de la discipline budgétaire dans la zone euro. La logique économique était d’éliminer l’aléa moral créé par la création du fonds. La logique politique, peut-être, était de rassurer les pays « frugaux » en échange de leur accord et d’exiger des pays endettés qu’ils acceptent un mécanisme de discipline budgétaire efficace en échange des transferts accordés. proposition Une autre occasion a été ratée. Les dettes publiques élevées, qui avaient déjà bien augmenté lors de la crise de la zone euro et qui sont en train d’encore grimper, sont dangereuses. Elles sont une source de fragilité, comme on l’a vu en 2010, et elles agissent comme une contrainte, comme on le voit en ce moment. De nombreuses propositions ont été avancées (dont ) et ignorées, encore une fois parce que les pays membres sont en désaccord. De nombreux pays vont émerger de la crise sanitaire avec des niveaux d’endettement public menaçants. Ils seront à nouveau en situation précaire lorsqu’arrivera le prochain choc, tout aussi imprévisible que les précédents. L’accord européen n’aborde pas cette question. la mienne

    View All